Program summer term 2018

 

Monday, April 16, 2018, 4:15pm, Hörsaal 28 D 001

Dr. Christian Fidler (RWTH Aachen University)

Simulations of the Universe in General Relativity

Abstract:
Newtonian dark matter simulations build the basis for our understanding of the formation of structure in our Universe, from small initial quantum fluctuations to the galaxies and clusters that can be observed at the present time. I discuss how these simulations can be understood from a relativistic point of view and how the same methods can further be employed to study the impact of additional species, such as neutrinos and baryons, on the cosmic evolution.

Host:

Julien Lesgourgues

 

Monday, May 7, 2018, 4:15pm, Hörsaal 28 D 001

Prof. Antonio Riotto (University of Geneva)

Inflation after the Higgs

Abstract:
The inflationary paradigm is able to explain why our universe is so homogeneous and isotropic and, at the same time, why it contains inhomogeneities, such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. We will review the current status of the inflationary cosmology, pointing out possible connections to the physics of the Standard Model Higgs.

Host:

Julien Lesgourgues

 

Monday, May 28, 2018, 4:15pm, Hörsaal 28 D 001

Prof. Dr. Freya Blekman (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

The Top portal to discovery at the Large Hadron Collider

Abstract:
The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle and was discovered only in 1995. Due to its extremely large mass, equivalent to a Gold atom, the top quark has the largest Yukawa coupling to the Standard Model Higgs boson and is also extremely sensitive to subtle and not-so-subtle signs of physics beyond the Standard Model.

After providing a historical perspective on the strategies and techniques that are used to identify the elusive top quarks, I will present how the Compact Muon Solenoid collaboration has been looking for new physics beyond the Standard Model using the top quark sector. To do so, cutting edge analysis techniques are necessary. I will focus on the most recent results from the CMS experiment and will look forward towards the LHC discovery potential in the future.

Host:

Alexander Schmidt

 

Monday, June 11, 2018, 4:15pm, Hörsaal 28 D 001

Prof. Sebastian Huber (ETH Zurich)

Topological Mechanics

Abstract:
The elastic properties of materials are determined by a few material constants such as the Young’s modulus. Using super-structures one can effectively change these “constants”. In this way we obtain functionalities such as wave-guiding, acoustic lensing or programmable failure. I will show how topological band theory, known from the description of electrons in solids, provides us with a powerful design-principle for such mechanical metamaterials. Moreover, mechanical metamaterials offer a powerful platform for the study of fundamentally new phenomena that are hard to observe in other arenas. Here, I will highlight the first measurement of a quadrupole topological insulator in a silicon based metamaterial and the implementation of an axial gauge field in an acoustic Weyl system.

Host:

Fabian Hassler

 

Monday, June 25, 2018, 4:15pm, Hörsaal 28 D 001

Prof. Chrisitian Enss (University of Heidelberg)

Metallic Magnetic-Calorimeters a Novel Key Technology for Neutrino Physics and Beyond

Abstract:
Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are state of the art cryogenic particle detectors which belong to the most sensitive devices to measure the energy of single quanta. Their universal applicability for particles and radiation as well as their high resolving power makes them a popular choice in many different experiments. Current fields of applications include X-ray spectroscopy, neutrino physics, material analysis, mass spectrometry and nuclear forensic. We will discuss the operating principle of MMCs, the basic material science behind their realization, as well as the status of development and recent applications. Here we will focus on the ECHo project, which uses MMCs to measure the electron capture spectrum of 163Ho for the determination of the electron neutrino mass.

Host:

Christopher Wiebusch

 

Monday, July 9, 2018, 4:15pm, Hörsaal 28 D 001

Dr. Daniela Dorner (University of Würzburg)

Monitoring the Non-Thermal Universe

Abstract:
Electromagnetic radiation from the Universe reaches us in all wave-bands from a variety of objects within and outside our galaxy. At high energies, the radiation is dominated by non-thermal emission. Among the objects in the non-thermal universe, the presentation will highlight one of the most powerful ones: Active galactic nuclei. One of their most distinct features is their extreme variability on time scales from minutes to years, giving high importance to monitoring these astrophysical sources. The presentation will discuss the multi-wavelength picture focussing on the very high energy regime. To study Active Galactic Nuclei in gamma rays, space-bourne and ground-based instruments are available. As gamma-rays interact with the Earth's atmosphere, a special indirect measurement technique is used. Instruments monitoring the non-thermal universe in gamma rays will be introduced, and their studies of Active Galactic Nuclei will be presented.

Host:

Thomas Bretz